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Brief history of new zealand pdf


Brief history of new zealand pdf

From the 1790s, the waters around New Zealand were visited by British, French and American whaling, sealing and trading ships. Their crews traded European goods, including guns and metal tools, for Mori food, water, wood, flax and sex. Zealand s achievement gave new hope and life to all women struggling for emancipation. For women in many countries, the struggle for voting rights would be long and difficult. Women at the polls Women voting in Auckland Suffrage opponents had warned that delicate lady voters. Walk around any New Zealand city today shows what a culturally diverse and fascinating country we have become. Premier John Ballance supported women's suffrage in principle, but privately he worried that women would vote for his Conservative opponents. Many of his Cabinet colleagues, including Richard Seddon who was a friend of the liquor trade, strongly opposed suffrage. Foreign policy involved support for Britain in the world wars, and close relations after 1940 with the United States and Australia. Foreign policy after 1980 became more independent especially in pushing for a nuclear-free region. It was subsequently Anglicised as New Zealand by British naval captain James Cook of HM Bark Endeavour who visited the islands more than 100 years after Tasman during 17691770. Cook returned to New Zealand on both of his subsequent voyages. The country's economy suffered in the aftermath of the 1973 global energy crisis, the loss of New Zealand 's biggest export market upon Britain's entry to the European Economic Community, and rampant inflation. In the 1980s the economy was largely deregulated and a number of. This movement was shaped by two main themes: equal political rights for women and a determination to use them for the moral reform of society (through, for example, the prohibition of alcohol). New. Zealand s pioneering suffragists were inspired both by the equal-rights arguments of. Only men were fitted for public life and the rough-and-tumble world of politics. In the later 19th century, some women began to challenge this narrow view of the world. New opportunities were opening up for women and girls (especially those from wealthy or middle-class families). Kate Sheppard Outside Parliament the movement gathered momentum from the mid-1880s, especially following the establishment of a. New. Zealand WCTU in 1885. Skilfully led by Kate Sheppard, WCTU campaigners itazura the animation english sub and others organised a series of huge petitions to Parliament: in 1891 more than 9000 signatures. In 18 the House of Representatives passed electoral bills that would have enfranchised all adult women. On each occasion, though, opponents sabotaged the legislation in the more conservative upper house, the Legislative Council, by adding devious amendments.


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